Spraying
Late blight disease, caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans, continues to be one of the most serious disease concerns for potato growers. Over the past few years, new genotypes of P. infestans have emerged creating new management challenges for commercial potato growers.
Published in Diseases
Researchers are investigating the use of digital sensor technology and machine learning for precision management applications and integrated pest management programs for potato growers. Combining digital cameras and computer algorithms to train sensors to identify crops and crop pests can help improve application efficiency, economics and environmental sustainability.
Published in Technology
Earlier this year, Syngenta Canada announced the launch of Orondis Gold Potato fungicide for the suppression of two common storage diseases, pink rot and Pythium leak, in potatoes.
Published in Chemicals
Orondis Potato Gold has been registered as an in-furrow treatment at planting for pink rot and Pythium leak or as a foliar application to control late blight. It’s one or the other, not both. So, what’s the best choice?
Published in Chemicals
Ontario’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) released its Guide to Weed Control for Hort Corp for 2019. The guide is now available online.
Published in News
BASF launches its Sefina insecticide for use on soybean and potato crops in 2019 to protect against aphid pests.
Published in News
Syngenta Canada announced the launch of Orondis Gold Potato fungicide for the suppression of two common storage diseases, pink rot and Pythium leak, in potatoes, on Jan. 14, 2019.
Published in News
Zebra chip is a serious disease that can kill potato plants, significantly reduce yields, and make infected tubers unmarketable. It was first documented in Mexico in 1994 and in Texas in 2000. Since then, it has spread northward through much of the Western United States, as well as to Central America and New Zealand.
Published in Diseases
A biopesticide for managing common scab would be an exciting advance for two key reasons, explains Dr. Martin Filion with the Université de Moncton.
Published in Diseases
2018 saw fewer problems with wireworm in Atlantic Canadian potato fields than past years, according to Christine Noronha, a research scientist for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada based in Prince Edward Island. But this doesn’t mean the problem has gone away.
Published in Diseases
For potato growers, one of the most concerning and costly diseases is late blight, caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Estimated to cost almost $10 billion per year worldwide, late blight spreads by spores and can spread quickly in a field. Post-harvest losses can be substantial if infected tubers are harvested and stockpiled. Like other disease pathogens, new strains and novel genotypes of P. infestans have emerged over the past few years, creating new challenges for commercial potato growers.
Published in Diseases
Eugenia Banks, Ontario potato specialist, attended a BASF meeting discussing several pesticides for potatoes will be coming through the pipeline for producers.
Published in Chemicals
Ontario corn producers are dealing with high-DON (deoxynivalenol) in grain corn this year. High amounts of the mycotoxin are harmful to animals, so high-DON corn is unsuitable for feed and producers have limited end use options.
Published in Crop Protection
Syngenta Canada Inc. announces the launch of Minecto Pro foliar-applied insecticide for broad-spectrum control of key pests in potatoes, apples, pears, and a variety of vegetable crops. 
Published in News
Syngenta Canada announces the registration of Vibrance Ultra Potato as a new seed treatment for the suppression of pink rot and control of other seed and soil-borne diseases, including late blight. 
Published in News
Black cutworms were found in a number of fields near Delhi, Ont., on July 26, according to Eugenia Banks' latest potato update. 
Published in Pest Control
The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) completed its re-evaluation of mancozeb and found the continued registration of products containing mancozeb acceptable for foliar application to potatoes in Canada.
Published in Diseases
Leading U.K. agronomy specialists, Levity CropScience, based at Myerscough College in Bilsborrow, recently unveiled their industry changing research at the British Potato exhibition in Harrogate.

Based on independent field trials, from 2015 to 2017, Levity has demonstrated that their product, Potato Lono, increases potato yields by up to $1,000 per hectare. Trials were held in England, Ireland, Netherlands, and France.

Potato Lono improves photosynthesis, and helps crops increase carbon efficiency during times of stress, improving tuber initiation and bulking. This can result in increased tuber numbers, when applied during tuber initiation, with trials showing increases of over 60,000 extra tubers per hectare across various potato varieties.

"We're excited to have revealed this groundbreaking data" said David Marks, Joint MD, Levity CropScience. "Our hard work has paid off and now growers around the world will be able to benefit from this research and our innovative application of this knowledge into unrivalled, pioneering fertilizer products."

Anne Weston, Joint MD, Levity CropScience added: "Over the next few weeks, we will be attending several exhibitions to meet farmers and their advisers to highlight and discuss our results, including the fantastic benefits Levity CropScience's products offer the farming and horticultural industries throughout the world. It is another example of how our innovative Lancashire company is driving research into increasing crop yields throughout the world, which will ultimately benefit both the environment and the local population."
Published in Research
Syngenta Canada Inc. has announced Orondis Ultra fungicide is now available in a premix formulation for added convenience.
Published in Diseases
Farmers know the importance of keeping the land, water and air healthy to sustain their farms from one generation to the next. They also know that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand-in-hand.

The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Member of Parliament for Delta and Minister of Public Services and Procurement, recently announced a $1.8 million investment with the University of British Columbia to determine carbon sequestration and GHG emissions, and develop beneficial management practices (BMPs) for increasing the efficiency of fertilizer use in blueberry, potato and forage crops.

This project with the University of British Columbia is one of 20 new research projects supported by the $27 million Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program (AGGP), a partnership with universities and conservation groups across Canada. The program supports research into greenhouse gas mitigation practices and technologies that can be adopted on the farm.

"This project will provide new science-based knowledge on net GHG emissions by accurately measuring GHG emissions and developing mitigation technologies for blueberry, potato and forage crops in the Lower Fraser Valley. The research team will use state-of-the-art instrumentation and automated measurement techniques to quantify annual GHG emissions. While the specific research objectives are targeted to fill regionally identified gaps in knowledge, they will be applicable more broadly to similar agricultural production systems across Canada and Global Research Alliance member countries," said Dr. Rickey Yada, Dean, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, UBC.
Published in Research
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