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A company started by six Mount Allison students sees a place for potato peels in furniture, flooring and ceiling tiles.

Enviroot's goal is to reduce waste by using food remains, especially potato peelings, to make a safe material for use in the home.

The company received a national business prize of $20,000 from Enactus Canada, a student-led entrepreneurial organization, and the McCain Social Enterprise Project Partnership to get the project going this summer.

"We use the potato peels that we get from McCain Foods here in New Brunswick in our particle board as a kind of filler," said Justin Trueman, Enviroot CEO and fourth-year biology student.

The potato peels are plasticized by melting them a little bit, and a bond between the potato peels' particles is created.

This allows them to bind products together without need of formaldehyde, which is the glues of some household furnishings, walls and stairs made from composite wood materials. READ MORE
From planting and digging potatoes to observing insects feeding on plants to learning about coloured spuds, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's (AAFC) Fredericton Research and Development Centre opened its doors and wowed visitors with plenty to see and do.
The agriculture and agri-food sector is a key growth industry in Canada, contributing over $100 billion annually to the economy and employing 2.3 million Canadians.
The Island's major potato processor is in the middle of some major upgrades at its New Annan, P.E.I. facility.
Potato farmers planted 344,884 acres (139 571 hectares) of potatoes in 2017, down 0.6 per cent from 2016, continuing the overall downward trend of the past 13 years. Seeded area decreased in every province except Quebec, Ontario and Alberta.
The accumulated precipitation is still below normal (50-80 per cent of normal) in most of the potato producing areas of the province.
Agriculture industry leaders met with federal, provincial and territorial agriculture ministers yesterday during the Canadian Federation of Agriculture's (CFA) annual Industry-Government FPT Roundtable in St. John's, Newfoundland, where they explored priorities and strategies to grow the sector. Discussion topics included the next Agriculture Policy Framework (APF), which is set to begin on April 1, 2018, efforts toward creating a National Food Policy, and NAFTA trade negotiations.
While P.E.I.'s recent stretch of hot, dry weather has been great for playing outdoors – it is starting to worry farmers.
The new Canadian Centre for Food Integrity (CCFI) elected inaugural board members from across Canada recently to build its mandate to help Canada’s food system earn trust. CCFI does this by providing a support service to assist Canada’s agri-food sector by coordinating consumer research, resources, dialogue, and training.
Out-of-the-ordinary archaeological finds never fail to fascinate us as we dig into the past – like the prehistoric potato granules unearthed in Utah, which experts say could be up to 10,900 years old.

To be more precise, these are starch granules from the Solanum jamesii plant, which produces small wild potatoes, and they could help us make the potatoes of today more resistant to drought and disease. | READ MORE
Housed in Canada's centre of excellence for potato research along the Saint John River Valley in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's (AAFC) scientists maintain a living library of nearly 180 potentially high-value potato gene resources. Canada's potato gene bank, or Canadian Potato Genetic Resources, is part of an international commitment to global food security.
Last month Statistics Canada released the results of the 2016 Census of Agriculture. Like many of you, I was eager to read up on the results and discover how our industry has changed in the five years since the last survey was conducted. 
A family of New Brunswick potato farmers are getting into the booze business by making vodka from spuds.
Last month Statistics Canada released the results of the 2016 Census of Agriculture. Like many of you, I was eager to read up on the results and discover how our industry has changed in the five years since the last survey was conducted. 
There will be no commercially grown GMO potatoes on Prince Edward Island this year, according to Simplot Plant Sciences, the company that developed the Innate potato.

Doug Cole, director of marketing and communications, said the company is holding off allowing commercial growth of Innate potatoes in Canada until there's a proven market for them. | READ MORE

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