Chemicals

“Although potato psyllids have been known in the past to cause some damage themselves, the real concern is mainly from the bacterium, and we don’t have it in Canada yet. But if our potato psyllid population continues to increase – as it has done during 2013 to 2016 – and if it becomes more continuous with U.S. populations, and if tomato and potato plants (and tubers) are shipped more frequently, then it could arrive,” says Dan Johnson, an entomologist at the University of Lethbridge. | READ MORE
The Prairie Pest Monitoring Network (PPMN), now in its 20th year, continues to provide timely crop insect pest risk and forecasting tools for growers and the industry across Western Canada. As technology and forecasting tools advance, so does the ability of the network to provide relevant insect pest information related to scouting, identification and monitoring tools and information, plus links to provincial monitoring and support relevant to the Canadian Prairies. | READ MORE
  An Islander has heeded the call to mass manufacture a trap to fight P.E.I.'s wireworm pest.
Nov. 28, 2016, Prince Edward Island – Health Canada's proposal to phase out a pesticide over three years will have a significant impact on Island farmers looking to control the Colorado potato beetle, says the P.E.I. Potato Board. | READ MORE
As part of the regular review process, Health Canada has completed its re-evaluation of imidacloprid, and has published its draft risk assessment for public comment. The assessment proposes current use of imidacloprid is not sustainable, and the levels of this pesticide that are being found in waterways and aquatic environments are harmful to aquatic insects, such as mayflies and midges, which are important food sources for fish, birds and other animals. Concentrations of imidacloprid in surface water can range from non-detectable to, in some rare cases, levels as high as 11.9 parts per billion, according to Health Canada. Scientific evidence indicates levels above 0.041 parts per billion are a concern. To address the risks identified, Health Canada has published a proposed risk management plan for public comment, which includes a proposed three-year phase-out of agricultural uses of imidacloprid in order to address risks to aquatic insects. In some cases, where there are no alternative pest control products available, a longer phase-out transition period of five years is being proposed. In a press release, Health Canada said it is consulting on these proposed mitigation measures, and the final re-evaluation decision and risk management plan will take into consideration any comments received during the consultations.  The consultation phase includes a 90-day commentary period in addition to a multi-stakeholder forum that will discuss any proposals for potential alternative mitigation strategies that would achieve the same outcomes in a similar timeframe.  Any proposals for continued registration will need to clearly demonstrate concrete actions to ensure levels of imidacloprid in water will be reduced below the level of concern. Based on the findings of the re-evaluation assessment on imidacloprid, Health Canada is also launching special reviews for two other widely used neonicotinoids: clothianidin and thiamethoxam. These special reviews will examine any potential risks these pesticides may pose to aquatic invertebrates, including insects, as they are also being detected frequently in aquatic environments. In the press release, Health Canada said it will provide updates as new information becomes available.
Bayer has launched Velum Prime nematicide, the first non-fumigant nematicide registered for potatoes in Canada. Velum Prime is a new mode of action and chemical class (pyridinyl ethyl benzamide) for nematode protection. It offers growers effective nematode protection that helps sustain plant vigor and maximize crop yield potential, according to a press release.Recent trials of Velum Prime demonstrated consistent yield and quality increases and reduction in plant parasitic nematodes, including root lesion, root knot and potato cyst nematode. Velum Prime is applied in-furrow at planting. It comes in a liquid formulation that offers reliable efficacy at low application rates making it ideal for use with existing in-furrow application equipment. Applied in-furrow, Velum Prime offers the added benefit of early blight protection. Maximum residue limits for Velum Prime applied in-furrow are in place supporting trade in North America and Europe. Additional MRLs supporting trade in other key export countries, including Japan, are expected early in 2017. For more information regarding Velum Prime, growers are encouraged to talk to their local retailer or visit cropscience.bayer.ca/VelumPrime.
Growing potatoes is an intensive business. With so many variables to control to ensure crop success, it may seem simpler to keep a schedule; for example, spraying for all weeds when they are at an average stage of development and then spraying for disease every Monday. But, according to a weed management specialist with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF) and the Ministry of Rural Affairs (MRA), this is not the best way to control weeds effectively – and maybe not even economically.
Jan. 10, 2014, Mississauga – BASF Canada has received regulatory approval for Outlook, a new herbicide for potato growers. As the amount and timing of rainfall becomes more variable, the company says Outlook will provide consistent control of nightshade, pigweed and annual grasses, even under drier conditions. Outlook is a Group 15 herbicide, which controls both triazine and Group 2-resistant biotypes whose populations continue to increase across the country. Outlook contains the active ingredient Dimethenamid-P which inhibits weed root and shoot growth, controlling susceptible weeds before they emerge from the soil. Outlook is applied after potatoes are planted but before they emerge from the soil.
Growers have been waiting for another option for managing rhizoctonia and now one is available. DuPont is releasing Vertisan this spring and the bonus is it contains new chemistry within Group 7 products. It also offers management of early blight as a foliar spray, giving growers another option for early blight.
Ever have a bin where, despite your best efforts to prevent rot, all you see are spoiled potatoes when you open the hatch? Applying fungicides or sprout inhibitors as the potatoes are placed in storage are obvious solutions, but what if the problem is the application or amount of the used product? Despite growers’ expertise, the method used for applying products as the tubers are placed into storage may be the problem.
May 4, 2016, Ontario – The early-planted potato crop in the Leamington area is sprouting nicely with strong, healthy sprouts. In the Simcoe-Delhi area, the second earliest area, planting is progressing well, according to the potato crop update from Eugenia Banks.A few seed lots coming from other provinces had high incidence of common scab and silver scurf.  Seed-borne silver scurf Silver scurf is a serious problem for fresh market growers. The fungus causes silvery brown lesions that can grow and join together covering most of the skin of the tuber. The fungus does not survive for very long in the soil, but does move from infected seed to daughter tubers. The variety Superior is very susceptible to silver scurf. If infected seed is planted, plan to harvest the crop as soon as the skin is set. Leaving potatoes in the ground after skin set stimulates the development of the fungus and results in more blemishes. Silver scurf also spreads easily in storage. High humidity increases sporulation, and air circulation in the pile spreads the spores to healthy tubers.  Quadris in-furrow and Emesto Silver as a seed treatment are labelled for silver scurf. Post-harvest applications of phosphorous-acid based fungicides have been reported to reduce the incidence of silver scurf. Late blight There were several outbreaks of late blight this year on potatoes and tomatoes grown in Florida. South Carolina has also reported late blight on tomatoes. All of the outbreaks were caused by US 23 strain. According to the potato pathologist at the University of Wisconsin, US 23 is susceptible to Ridomil. 
April 28, 2015 - Farmers in Ontario are being offered expanded options to manage their empty seed and pesticide bags this year. This pilot is part of the agricultural industry's commitment to the responsible management of its products throughout their entire lifecycle and will help determine the feasibility of a permanent program. "This pilot project will build on the solid agricultural stewardship programming that is already in place in Ontario and provide farmers with more options for managing packaging waste on the farm and contributing to long-term goals of keeping agricultural waste out of landfills," says Barry Friesen, general manager of CleanFARMS. CleanFARMS will collect, transport and ensure collected bags are safely converted to energy at facilities that have extensive emission controls and meet all necessary provincial and federal approvals. Farmers can contribute to a clean and healthy environment by ensuring that empty seed and pesticide bags end up in the right place. "The end-of-life stewardship programs that CleanFARMS operates play an important role in our ongoing commitment to environmental stewardship," adds Mark Brock, chair of the Grain Farmers of Ontario. Funding for this pilot program is provided by CropLife Canada, the Canadian Seed Trade Association, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, and the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change. WhenMay to September 2015 Collection SitesCollection sites will be located at participating retailers in Ontario. A list of participating retail collection sites can be found at CleanFARMS.ca. What Empty pesticide bags: multi-walled paper, plastic and aluminum Empty seed bags: multi-walled paper and polywoven plastic How to return Bags:Obtain free collection bags from select agricultural retailers Ensure that your seed or pesticide bags are empty Place the empty bags in the collection bag Return your full, tied bags to a participating retailer. Bags will be accepted free of charge and sent for safe disposal.CleanFARMS is a not-for-profit industry stewardship organization committed to environmental responsibility through the proper management of agricultural waste. For a list of all recycling programs, visit CleanFARMS.ca.
April 4, 2014, Guelph, Ont. – Reason, a foliar potato fungicide from Bayer CropScience Canada, is now registered for use as a seed piece treatment. When applied as a seed piece treatment, the company says Reason provides protection against seed-borne late blight. Now, Reason can be used to protect against late blight and early blight through foliar applications and for seed-borne late blight protection. As a seed-piece treatment Reason can be used alone when late blight is a threat or as a tank mix with Titan and/or Titan Emesto, according to a press release from Bayer.  For more information www.BayerCropScience.ca.
Feb. 20, 2014, Guelph, Ont. – Syngenta Canada Inc. has received registration for Cruiser Maxx Potato Extreme seed treatment for use on potato crops in Canada. The all-in-one liquid pre-mix delivers a concentrated formulation that is simple and convenient to use and provides reliable protection from seed-borne diseases and early-season insects. Cruiser Maxx Potato Extreme contains three active ingredients for comprehensive control, according to a press release from Syngenta. The Group 4 insecticide, thiamethoxam, works systemically to provide broad-spectrum performance. "In the plant, it is translocated via the plant's water-conducting system where it remains active for up to 100 days. Cruiser Maxx Potato Extreme provides two modes of action against disease," the release stated. "The combination of Group 3 fungicide, difenoconazole, and Group 12 fungicide, fludioxonil, offer a broad spectrum of control, including protection from silver scurf, Rhizoctonia control, and a second mode of action against resistant Fusarium."
Feb. 19, 2014, Guelph, Ont. – Bayer CropScience Canada has received registration for Serenade Soil, a new biological fungicide for fruit and vegetable crops, including potatoes. With a unique mode of action (FRAC Group 44), the company says Serenade Soil creates a disease protection zone around the seed and roots. The beneficial bacteria in the fungicide grow with the plant, expanding the disease protection zone and creating armor for the seed and the roots against common soil diseases like rhizoctonia and pythium. The mode of action is exempted from maximum residue limits, and has a zero day pre-harvest interval, according to a Bayer press release. "Studies have shown that because Serenade Soil helps activate the plant’s natural defense mechanism it improves root colonization, increases efficiency of photosynthesis, and improves plant growth," the press release said. Its liquid formulation allows for tank-mixing with both fungicide and insecticide products. For more information, visit BayerCropScience.ca
Proven and new chemistry products launched by Syngenta Crop Protection Canada in 2009 are giving growers some new options for seed treatments and late blight control. Revus, registered in 2009, is billed as a “late blight specialist,” while Cruiser Max Potatoes is the first liquid seed piece treatment for both insect and disease control.

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