Diseases
2018 saw fewer problems with wireworm in Atlantic Canadian potato fields than past years, according to Christine Noronha, a research scientist for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada based in Prince Edward Island. But this doesn’t mean the problem has gone away.
For potato growers, one of the most concerning and costly diseases is late blight, caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Estimated to cost almost $10 billion per year worldwide, late blight spreads by spores and can spread quickly in a field. Post-harvest losses can be substantial if infected tubers are…
Scouting and monitoring help reduce yield and quality losses and can save time and money. Diseases can manifest during the growing season, or at and after harvest, therefore scouting and monitoring can help identify diseases early in the cropping or storage cycle when it may still be possible to slow…
A number of Ontario potato growers began noticing moist grey and brown lesions around wounds and the stem ends in their harvested potatoes in the fall – the first signs of Pythium leak. Measures to minimize the potential problem were initiated because, if the crop isn’t managed carefully as it…
Research that would help determine what species and strains of the common scab bacterium are prevalent in Ontario is underway, according to Eugenia Banks, potato specialist with the Ontario Potato Board.
Pythium leak has been observed in a number of fields in Ontario this harvest season, according to Eugenia Banks, potato specialist with the Ontario Potato Board.
As of August 28, 2018, the spore traps in Alliston, Ont. are still testing positive for spores of late blight. The positive results follow a discovery of late blight in a field near Alliston on August 14.
A new strain of late blight, US-25, has been identified in New York state, according to Eugenia Banks’ latest potato update.
Late blight was found in a field near Alliston, Ont. on August 14, according to Eugenia Banks, potato specialist with the Ontario Potato Board.
Weather conditions in P.E.I. are prime for early blight spread and growers should consider applying preventative fungicides now, according to P.E.I. Potato Agronomy's update.
The results from Ontario spore traps are negative for late blight in Alliston, Shelburne and Simcoe-Delhi areas as of July 31, according to Eugenia Banks’ latest potato update.
An automated spore trap has been developed in the U.K. which could change the way disease monitoring is done for crops and help farmers target fungicide applications better. 
Ontario's hot weather keeps late blight in check but some growers are seeing sunburnt stems and heat stress in their potato crop. 
The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) completed its re-evaluation of mancozeb and found the continued registration of products containing mancozeb acceptable for foliar application to potatoes in Canada.
The results from Ontario spore traps, in Alliston, Leamington, Simcoe-Delhi, and Shelburne areas, returned negative detecting no late blight spores, according to Eugenia Banks’ latest potato update.
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